Litchfield National Park

Litchfield National Park is a must see if you're in the Top End. 

It's home to several stunning waterfalls that cascade into crystal clear pools, iconic magnetic termite mounds and clusters of weathered sandstone pillars at the Lost City. 

Swimming under the falls and relaxing in waterholes is a favourite pastime for visitors and locals alike. 

It is a popular day tour destination from Darwin or Katherine, but many visitors choose to stay overnight in one of the campgrounds. 

Beautiful walks leave from most popular sites. 

Read more about short walks in Litchfield National Park.

If you're looking for more of a challenge there is the 39km Tabletop Track or there are plenty of tricky four-wheel drive tracks.

Shelter from the heat in shady monsoon forest in the ancient gorges created over thousands of years ago. It is a haven for hundreds of native bird species and the plateau supports a rich range of woodland flora.

Get the Litchfield National Park fact sheet and map (806.0 kb)

Get the swimming in Litchfield National Park information sheet (782.1 kb).

Litchfield National Park - Florence Falls Litchfield National Park - Wangi Falls Litchfield National Park - Camping area

What to see and do

You can do all of the following activities in Litchfield National Park:

  • swimming
  • camping
  • bushwalking
  • wildlife spotting
  • visit scenic lookouts
  • view historic ruins
  • four-wheel driving.

Camping

Generators and pets are not permitted inside the park.

Camping is available year round at Wangi, Florence Falls and Buley Rockhole. Wangi Falls also has non-powered caravan sites.

Four-wheel drive camping areas are available at Tjaynera Falls (Sandy Creek), Surprise Creek Falls and Florence Falls.

There are walk-in camping sites along Walker Creek, though these are closed during the Wet Season.

Commercial accommodation is available just outside of the park.

How to get there

The park is approximately 120km south-east from Darwin via Batchelor on a fully-sealed road. 

It is also accessible during the Dry Season via Cox Peninsula Road, which has some unsealed sections, and the 4WD Reynolds Track from Daly River Road in the south. 

Check if this park is open

Find out if the Litchfield National Park is open.

Opening hours

All year round. 

Check road conditions if you plan on driving the Cox Peninsula Road or the Reynolds Track.

Contact

Phone: (08) 8976 0282

Facilities

Litchfield National Park has all of the following facilities:

  • cafĂ© at the Wangi Centre, Wangi Falls
  • information signs
  • ranger station
  • 4WD roads
  • fire pits
  • public toilets
  • disabled access
  • picnic areas
  • caravan sites
  • accommodation
  • showers
  • walking tracks
  • souvenir shop
  • telephone.

Please remember

When visiting the park, remember all of the following:

  • bins are not provided so take your rubbish with you
  • glass containers are not permitted within 10m of the water
  • stay on marked roads and tracks
  • cultural items and wildlife are protected
  • pets are not permitted
  • don't feed native animals
  • nets, traps and firearms are not permitted
  • be careful with fire and light fires only in fireplaces provided
  • do not use soaps and detergents in or near waterways
  • camp in designated camping areas
  • collect fallen timber for firewood from the main Litchfield Park Road
  • generators are not permitted
  • follow all fishing laws
  • check that you vehicle is not transporting weeds and pests like cane toads.

Safety

You can have a safe and comfortable trip to Litchfield National Park by doing all of the following:

  • swim only in marked areas
  • observe park safety signs
  • carry and drink plenty of water
  • wear a hat, insect repellent and sunscreen
  • wear suitable clothing and footwear
  • carry a first aid kit
  • avoid strenuous activity during the heat of the day
  • take note of locations of Emergency Call Devices
  • make sure your vehicle is well-maintained and equipped
  • beware of theft, lock vehicles and secure valuables.

Do not sit on bare ground or grass as scrub typhus is transmitted by microscopic bush mites on grasses and bushes. Read more on scrub typhus

You should only swim in designated areas.

Last updated: 29 February 2016