Prohibited wildlife

Prohibited entrants or animals include all wildlife not native to the Northern Territory (NT) and all exotic wildlife that is not native to Australia. 

You must have a permit to keep or a permit to import or export any prohibited wildlife. Applications for these permits are assessed on a case by case basis.

Some exotic animals are not allowed, because they would pose a high risk to the NT's biodiversity and environment if they escaped and established populations in the wild, such as ferrets.

The animals listed on this page are in this group of 'restricted animals' and are banned from introduction to the NT.

Mustelidae family: ferrets

Ferrets are related to stoats and weasels and are a little smaller than domestic cats. 

Ferrets are carnivorous and may impact severely on native birds, mammals and reptiles if released in the NT.

There is a serious concern about ferrets spreading disease.

It is illegal to import or keep ferrets in the NT.

Axolotls or Mexican walking fish

Axolotls are lizard-like amphibians. 

Axolotls are aggressive eaters and may impact on native frog and fish populations. 

There is a serious concern about axolotls spreading disease.

It is illegal to import or keep axolotls in the NT.

Frogs

All frog species not native to the NT are illegal in the NT. You can't get a permit to import a frog into the NT from other states and territories.

Captive frogs may pick up diseases in captivity that may not be present in the wild, so you should never release captive frogs back into the wild.

If you do not wish to keep a frog, you should give it to a new owner or a dealer, or give it to Parks and Wildlife. Otherwise, you will have to take it to a vet to be euthanised.

Turtles

You must have a permit to keep all turtles in the NT, except for the northern long-necked turtle. 

You can not get a permit to import turtles into the NT, even if they were purchased in the Territory originally.

Captive turtles pose a high risk of spreading disease to wild turtles if released.

You should never release turtles that have been in captivity back into the wild, even to the same location that they came from.

It is illegal to import or keep the exotic red-eared slider turtle in the NT.

If you no longer wish to keep the turtle, you should give it to a new owner or a dealer, or give it to Parks and Wildlife. Otherwise, you will have to take it to a vet to have it euthanised.

Last updated: 27 June 2017