Carry out preliminary activities and aerial surveys

On 1 January 2021, the Petroleum Regulations 2020 came into effect.

If you are a petroleum company that wants to carry out preliminary activities or aerial surveys, there are rules you must follow.

Preliminary activities

You don’t need an approved land access agreement for preliminary activities with a landholder, but you must notify them first.

Types of preliminary activities

Preliminary activities include:

  • taking water samples
  • taking rock samples without using heavy machinery
  • taking soil samples to a depth of up to four metres
  • carrying out surveys that don’t involve the:
    • clearing of any vegetation
    • permanent installation of any infrastructure or equipment on land
  • driving a vehicle, other than a heavy vehicle, on land relating to your preliminary activities.

Before you begin your activities

You must issue a notice to the landholder to inform them of your activities.

It is an offence under the Petroleum Regulations 2020 to carry out preliminary activities without giving the landholder notice.

You must give at least 14 days’ notice before you start.

Follow these steps:

Step 1. Notify the landholder

To notify the landholder, follow these steps:

Step 1a. Fill in the notice of preliminary activities DOCX (69.8 KB).

You must include the following information:

  • a plan and description of the land you want to conduct preliminary activities on
  • your petroleum interest
  • the preliminary activities you want to carry out
  • details of any vehicle or equipment you will use on the land for the activities
  • the number of people expected to be involved in the activities
  • when you will carry out the activities
  • how long the activities will take
  • your contact details.

Step 1b. Issue the notice to the landholder.

Step 2. Notify the chief executive officer

You must notify the Department of Industry, Tourism and Trade chief executive officer within seven days of issuing the notice of preliminary activities to the landholder.

Follow these steps:

Step 2a. Fill in the notice to chief executive officer DOCX (65.6 KB).

Step 2b. Submit the form to Land Access.

After you have given notice

After you have notified the landholder, you can carry out your activities.

You must:

  • not drive a vehicle off an existing road or track during your activities without written consent from the landholder
  • backfill any hole created during your activities with the remaining soil or material extracted when creating the hole, as soon as possible.

It is an offence if you fail to comply with these requirements.

Aerial surveys

You don’t need an approved land access agreement for aerial surveys with the landholder, but you must notify them first.

Before you begin your survey

You must issue a notice to the landholder to inform them of your activity.

It is an offence under the Petroleum Regulations 2020 to carry out an aerial survey without giving the landholder notice.

You must give at least 14 days’ notice before you start.

Follow these steps:

Step 1. Notify the landholder

To notify the landholder, follow these steps:

You must include the following information:

  • a plan and description of the land you want to survey
  • information about your petroleum interest
  • a description of the survey
  • details of the aircraft you will use
  • the altitude at which the survey will be carried out
  • when you will carry out the survey
  • how long the survey will take
  • your contact details.

Step 1b. Issue the notice to the landholder.

Step 2. Notify the chief executive officer

You must notify the Department of Industry, Tourism and Trade chief executive officer within seven days of issuing the notice of airborne activity to the landholder.

Follow these steps:

Step 2a. Fill in the notice to chief executive officer DOCX (65.6 KB).

Step 2b. Submit the form to Land Access.

After you have given notice

You must carry out your survey with minimal disturbance to livestock.

It is an offence to disturb livestock if it can be reasonably avoided.

Last updated: 15 February 2021

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