Don't let your pets get heatstroke

As temperatures rise at this time of year, pet owners should be aware of the threat of pet heatstroke.

Locking pets in cars or failing to provide adequate shade and water amounts to animal cruelty. Temperatures inside a locked car can increase very quickly—it can take six minutes or less for an animal to suffer severe heat exhaustion and die.

Signs of pet heatstroke;

  • Breathing or sudden rapid break
  • blank or anxious state
  • excess salivation
  • heart rate
  • red gums and tongue
  • vomiting
  • weakness
  • or sudden collapse.

First aid for pet heatstroke:

* take action immediately

* move the pet to a cooler area

* immerse, cover, or rub your pet with cool water to lower its body temperature

* seek prompt veterinary care—even if your pet appears to be recovering she may be dehydrated or have other complications.

Heavy penalties can apply if pets are harmed when left in vehicles or without adequate shade or water.

View Animal Welfare’s information about caring for pets. Find out more about being a responsible pet owner.

Pet owners should be aware of the threat of pet heatstroke.